jess. 19. colorado and maryland. super gay. kind of a massive dork, sorry bout that.

chicken blog
sometimes i take pictures
sometimes i draw too
my dumb face
the bird children
my lazyass dogs
corvid for president

30th September 2014

Photo reblogged from Tiger Skins and other Things with 179 notes

nikonf2s:

Concentration! - (thankfully not on us)
Botswana bush- lands Okavango Delta. September 2012
Nikon D300 70-300 f4.5 - 5.6G  Shot at 300mm f20 1/250th.

nikonf2s:

Concentration! - (thankfully not on us)

Botswana bush- lands Okavango Delta. September 2012

Nikon D300 70-300 f4.5 - 5.6G  Shot at 300mm f20 1/250th.

Source: nikonf2s

30th September 2014

Photoset reblogged from All Tail No Legs: Snake Blog with 325 notes

crispysnakes:

2014 Yellowjacket line Black Headed Python (Aspidites melanocephalus)

Produced by Derek Roddy, owned by CrystelLand.

Source: crispysnakes

30th September 2014

Photo reblogged from Birds on the Brain with 12 notes

dendroica:

Barrier Islands Feeling the Effects of Climate Change

A new report from the National Research Council finds that the effect of climate change is especially harsh on these islands. Population growth in much of this long coast “is nearly twice the national average,” the report said. Meanwhile, “these same coasts are subject to impact by some of the most powerful storms on earth and the destruction potential of these events is increasing due to climate change and relative sea-level rise.”
And so far, the report added, “as a compassionate nation, we rally each time a disaster strikes and provide resources for postdisaster recovery that far exceed those we are willing to provide to manage risk.”
The panel calls for a regional or even national approach to managing coastal hazards — a “proactive” effort to protect life, landscape and property, rather than the “disjointed and largely reactive approach” that has marked coastal protection efforts.
Until relatively recently, barrier islands defended themselves against rising seas by, in a sense, moving to higher ground: Storms washed beach sand to the islands’ inland side; inlets formed and healed, usually leaving sand deposits behind the islands. This process worked well, as geologists noticed after the Ash Wednesday storm in 1962, a nor’easter that battered much of the East Coast through five high tides. Afterward, they reported that beach recovery was fastest and most robust in areas with the least development.

(via NYTimes.com)
Image: Aerial view of a breach in the Fire Island National Seashore caused by Hurricane Sandy. Credit: National Park Service.

dendroica:

Barrier Islands Feeling the Effects of Climate Change

A new report from the National Research Council finds that the effect of climate change is especially harsh on these islands. Population growth in much of this long coast “is nearly twice the national average,” the report said. Meanwhile, “these same coasts are subject to impact by some of the most powerful storms on earth and the destruction potential of these events is increasing due to climate change and relative sea-level rise.”

And so far, the report added, “as a compassionate nation, we rally each time a disaster strikes and provide resources for postdisaster recovery that far exceed those we are willing to provide to manage risk.”

The panel calls for a regional or even national approach to managing coastal hazards — a “proactive” effort to protect life, landscape and property, rather than the “disjointed and largely reactive approach” that has marked coastal protection efforts.

Until relatively recently, barrier islands defended themselves against rising seas by, in a sense, moving to higher ground: Storms washed beach sand to the islands’ inland side; inlets formed and healed, usually leaving sand deposits behind the islands. This process worked well, as geologists noticed after the Ash Wednesday storm in 1962, a nor’easter that battered much of the East Coast through five high tides. Afterward, they reported that beach recovery was fastest and most robust in areas with the least development.

(via NYTimes.com)

Image: Aerial view of a breach in the Fire Island National Seashore caused by Hurricane Sandy. Credit: National Park Service.

30th September 2014

Photo reblogged from Thalassarche with 15,343 notes

Tagged: bird love

Source: mvninn

30th September 2014

Photoset reblogged from Death of a Marshmallow with 29,104 notes

Mind-blowing 19th century oil paintings depicting elements of North African Islamic society by Austrian Jewish and French artists Ludwig Deutsch, Rudolf Ernst and Jean-Léon Gérôme.

Source: leseanthomas

30th September 2014

Photo reblogged from Jack the Vulture with 1,118 notes

Tagged: favperfection with wings

Source: the-weird-wide-web

30th September 2014

Photo reblogged from Shove a Pumpkin Up Your Ass with 268 notes

kraeftiger:

This is Cerveza, the grey banded king snake. <3

kraeftiger:

This is Cerveza, the grey banded king snake. <3

Source: kraeftiger

30th September 2014

Video reblogged from What a wonderful world with 110,582 notes

aaliyah1979-2001:

valiantparadox:

My roommate and I have had far too much coffee and I think our neighbors hate us

WHO DID THIS

Tagged: oh my god

Source: valiantparadox

30th September 2014

Photo reblogged from Ryan Haywood is a Menace with 5,318 notes

freelancerkiwi:

mutantragequitpsycho:

if this isnt the face of “are you fucking kidding me?” idk what is

he doesn’t even have to look at gavin to know hes doing something stupid

freelancerkiwi:

mutantragequitpsycho:

if this isnt the face of “are you fucking kidding me?” idk what is

he doesn’t even have to look at gavin to know hes doing something stupid

Source: mutantragequitpsycho

30th September 2014

Photoset reblogged from & there is so much space with 14 notes

rainbrolly:

mount usher gardens, ashford, co. wicklow, ireland

september 24, 2014